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20121205
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
out where he was. and a cia team is responsible for that. >> right. >> and then it's the story of how they went in there and killed him. >> yes. >> the first part of the story centers around actress jessica chastain plays a cia person. is that a real person? >> well, again, they're all based on real people. >> right. so there is a real cia agent that she plays who found the link to the courier who took them. >> with her tenacity, her courage and her dedication, you know, really drove that lead forward. and gave it a lot of traction. you know, and i think the interesting thing about the movie is it really puts you in her shoes. it puts you in that intelligence hunt and gives you a glimpse into the intelligence community and the dedication of these men and women including her. but all the men and women that are involved in something -- in an operation that is this complicated and this arduous. >> have you met her, or did mark meet her? >> well, we protect our sources. i'll leave it at that. >> you know, were you surprised that there was a woman who was so intricately involved? because a
team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how did you source that story. >> katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a filmmakerer? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly tried to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went wrong her
questions as well. i would point to the issue over the cia talking points and these decisions to make changes that critics say really minimize the role of al qaeda and affiliated groups in this attack, martha. martha: certainly got the right people in the room to answer a lot of those questions. we'll see if they get anywhere conclusive today. you know one of the big issues that has been raised by all of this of course, catherine, is our intelligence on the ground in benghazi. what are we learning about the future of that annex and our presence there? >> reporter: fox news has learned that the decision to close the cia annex and to destroy all of the classified information and move out the classified communications equipment came within 12 hours, 12 hours of the at dark -- attack on the consulate itself and early morning september 12th, by 8:00 local time, effectively the cia operation in benghazi was shuttered. all the classified information was moved or burned as well as the equipment and this was a decision fox was told was made on the ground. then there was notification to washing
in the world. our cia are out there all over the world but they have to get information. they collect it and analyze it. look at what happened in benghazi. that's another issue. we knew that it was a hot spot, but we didn't have intelligence that they were going to attack. >> greta: therein proves my point. that was another intelligence where we might have the hardest working people in the world, the best in the world but the fact is intelligence failures do happen with even the best. that's why it's very hard to have a lot of sort of comfort in terms of what happens with these, you know, chemical weapons should assad leave. >> no question. >> greta: mistakes happen. >> we can't be the sheriff for the whole world, so we have to work with other countries an other allies. as serious as the situation is in syria, we've got to work with russia. >> greta: let me ask you a quick question. you've actually met president assad. tell me your impression. >> on our way to iraq we had to go -- we were asked to go and stop by to see assad. this was right after, maybe six months after president obam
is that the hollywood people got access to cia operatives, to cia locations, that they had access to the navy s.e.a.l.s which they should not have had. i can't really go beyond that over to say the investigation has gone on an expanded. >> ahead, we're going to talk a little bit about this movie and whether or not that's the case. you know, i wonder if national security was really compromised. >> it's been a consistent conversation. not just about this movie, right? we've had it several times. is there information coming from the administration that constantly seems to be in a positive light and does that information go beyond and risk national security issues? i think it's a legitimate debate. >> okay. fine, what is it then? like what? we keep saying it's possible, possible national security. like what? >> we've covered it extensively. >> like what? >> the kill list, we've talked about the details of the operation to kill anwar al awlaki, the cyber attack on iran, whenever it's positive we get to hear a lot about it. >> the kill list was reported during the administration of president george w
of the cia instead. and get this. the reason why he said -- this was a 90-minute conversation he had with fox news national security analyst, kathleen mcfarland who went on ailes' behest to pitch this. petraeus said at the time my wife would divorce me if i decided to run. i love my wife. we have a beautiful house with his and hers bathrooms, believe it or not. i just want to live in it. i've never spent a night in it. >> he was doing other things, i guess. >>> it's also raising an interesting debate. should the head of a news organization be actively involved in recruiting candidates for president? obviously, you know, in this day and age, we know which network leans left, which network leans right. should you be that actively involved to say i will quit to run someone's campaign? it raises an interesting debate and media circles, i think, as well. >> rogers ailes denies this, saying the strategist that went on his behalf to pitch this. that sonny was way out of line. and zero chance he would leave fox. the money was too good. that's what we say about our jobs. >> yes, that's exactly what we
a future republican director of the cia and the pentagon working for you, a future republican secretary of state working for you. >> steve hadley. >> and a future republican national security adviser as well as madeleine albright, another democrat, but you had as many powerful republican leaders, future leaders, are as powerful democratic leaders. >> the president should be doing every week, almost every day, you have to be meeting with some of them, having dinner with them, talking to them, chatting. >> yes. >> and also threatening occasionally. >> by the way, mika has circled all the dinner guests that you've had over the years. >> some of them worked for my dad. >> it's the same principle that works in journalism, everyone knows if you're going to garn aeroreport, it's far better to get a source face-to-face. it's far bettory get a source of the fund than a person via e-mail. >> and best of all to have a relati relationship with them. >> it's just intimacy that happens between a source and a reporter. >> this president does not like that. he's not comfortable in this person, lbj, jfk
's keeping his own council abthat. he's alleges got the cia slot to fill as well. there are rumors there may be changes on his national security team. but nobody is being very specific about it at this point. >> shira, just the optics of the gop engaged in -- in a days-long filibuster with regards to susan rice, attacking susan rice for days. is that a fight that they want to pick? >> you'd think they wouldn't want to pick this fight, especially when there are other well-qualified people who want to be secretary of state such as john kerry, the senator of massachusetts, has made no secret at all that this is a position he's wanted far really long time. so you think this would not be a battle the white house would pick. but obviously the president has a lot of loyalty to susan rice. his defense of her a couple weeks ago from the podium was really unique and frankly defensive. so if this is who he wants, he has every right to nominate her and the senate has every right to say no. >> david, before i let you guys get out of here, i had katon dawson on a few minutes ago. saturdays we like to enga
confessed being agents for the cia and the mossad and the mi6. even the public wonders how much time that have during the week for public services. no one believes that. not a single irony and believes that these people who served the revolution in the first decade have completely become counterrevolutionaries. the kite the it is used to instigate and put fear into the heart of the iranian public. the prime minister was chosen by the ayatollah khomeini. is he is not safe and has to appear on show trial and people were capped at ministers have to appear, and i, as a simple iranian citizen, i am totally at their mercy. this is the change which has taken place. >> thanks, ali. emanuel, want to move on to you about the indifference that marina felt during her imprisonment about the outside world and given ali's surveys and that having panels on the human rights record of iran is somewhat of a novelty in washington -- what does that say about what the west is doing? what measures are the united states taking specifically aimed at iran of its human rights record as opposed to poor for rati
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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